Tag Archives: an english country garden

Allowing the brush to dance….

The following watercolour/gouache painting is an example of warming up, playing and allowing the brush to dance…..

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I cut an unsuccessful painting into quarters so that I could re use the paper for this and other images.

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Using a mix of Opera Rose gouache – plus a little permanent white gouache I rapidly indicate the flower heads….I use violet and Alizarin crimson to indicate the darker areas of the flower.

Note that the underlying colour from the original sketch integrates with the flower.

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Allowing my brush to dance across the surface, using a mix of burnt sienna and prussian blue watercolour, I begin to indicate the stems and leaves.   I have also added a little Winsor & Newton green gold – an expensive pigment, but one I highly recommend.

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Using a knife I scrape out some of the paint while still wet….which gives a sense of energy and movement.

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In the final frame, I mix some Green Gold with permanent white gouache to highlight areas of the image and to indicate seed pods.    I also move more opera rose around the image to bring a sense of harmony and balance.

This is all about spontaneity.     Working like this is a great way to hone observational skills.     The key is to let go, be playful and allow the paint to do its own thing……It also helps to work on several pieces at the same time.

I would also add that my ‘wet brush no paint’ technique is used throughout….this means as I add colour, I immediately clean my brush to pull out the colour.    This prevents muddiness, the enemy of all watercolour painters:)

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Here is a Magical Hummingbird to start the new week…..

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http://www.janetweightreed.co.uk

HummingbirdHQ.com

A bientôt

To understand and be understood.

When I first met Anne and Mike twenty years ago in The Magical Town of Crickadoon, there was an immediate connection.     Sometimes that happens.

One of the most beautiful qualities of true friendship is to understand and be understood.  Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Anne in her Wilshire garden.

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A year ago Anne and Mike moved from their ancient dwelling on top of a mountain in the beautiful Brecon Beacons National Park in Wales back to Wiltshire where they had lived many years before.    This past weekend, I visited them in their new home.

Quick  watercolour/gouache study from the garden. 

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Over the years I have come to know Anne and Mike’s six children and numerous grandchildren.   Part of this weekend’s visit was to make preliminary sketches of one branch of the family for what will ultimately be a large family portrait.

Preliminary sketch of Jake.   Last time I painted him he was about 10 years old.      

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As is always the case the weekend was filled with stimulating conversation, laughter and the sort of comfort and peace that is experienced  when spending time with like minded people.  Oh and I mustn’t forget the fantastic food:)

Observing the reflection of clouds in the garden pond. 

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I always learn so much when I am with Anne and Mike.  Their generosity of spirit reflects upon all the people they touch.     I am most fortunate to be one of those people.

A Bientôt